Thursday, May 25, 2017

Private jet cards have become increasingly popular. There are a variety of providers who issue the cards and each issuer has somewhat different features. So it is important to spend a little time comparing what is available and choosing the one that best suits your needs. Below are some points to consider when purchasing a jet card.

Sales data from the General Aviation Manufacturers Association (GAMA) shows deliveries in 2016 were lower than for several years. The annual databook reported 661 new business jets sold worldwide in 2016 compared to 718 unit sales in 2015. Here are some of the highlights and the sales by manufacturer.

We’ve previously written about the main reasons for flying on private jets. These include the time saving, the privacy, the convenience and the flexibility. Recently we’ve heard of a couple more reasons to add to this list. While these additional reasons don’t make compelling cases on their own, they certainly add to the consideration set.

It always amazes me just how many people are caught out when they make the decision to sell their aircraft, but when you look at the array of specialists offering to support the sales process, it is hardly surprising.

It’s often said that in excess of 80%, as many as 85% perhaps, of all jet sales transactions involve an appointed broker, so my primary focus here is to help guide you through this selection process.

Acquiring your own aircraft takes some thought and planning. If you know what you’re doing and have a good team to help you, the process can go fairly smoothly. But, if you haven’t bought a plane before or if you want to try and “wing it”, you can be in for some exciting surprises. Here’s a look at some of the biggest mistakes that can happen along the way.

Looking at the latest ten-year forecasts for the business jet industry, it appears as though the next decade will bring slow growth overall. Several forecasts see a peak within the next five years followed by a downturn, although this decline is softer than has been seen in the past.

The International Standard for Business Aircraft Operations, or IS-BAO, is a code of best practices that serves as the gold standard for business aviation around the world. It was developed by the International Business Aviation Council (IBAC) in 2002 and has been endorsed by the National Business Aviation Association (NBAA). At the time of writing, more than 700 operators worldwide are IS-BAO registered.

Numerous factors affect the market for used business jets. This article reviews some of the major drivers and explains how they are affecting the current market.

The answer to the question, on the cost of a private jet, depends on if you are looking to own a plane, or just use and rent one. But ownership or renting is just a starting point, there are multiple other factors to consider, the most important discussions center around what you need the aircraft to do. This article outlines the costs for each option, with some specific examples.

The data from the General Aviation Manufacturers Association (GAMA) shows sales in 2015 were at the same level as 2014. The annual databook reported 718 new business jets sold worldwide in 2015 compared to 722 unit sales in 2014. Here are some of the highlights and the sales by manufacturer.